Owl Always Love You


Family BugsA couple weeks ago I posted about one of my newest patterns: Fauxy the Fox. Isn’t she just adorable? You can find the pattern in my Etsy shop if you are interested. But, I wanted to make a whole collection of woodland-y animals. I’ve heard that collections sell really well. When my mother-in-law requested an owl to gift to someone else, I knew what creature was coming next!

As always, the first thing I did was basic research. What does a real owl look like, and how can I cutesify it to be a similar style to match my fox? I found my inspiration pretty quickly and then set off to make my own. Four times. That’s how long it took before I realized I wasn’t gonna be able to make my own. The first one was *special*. No matter how many times I redid the eyes, they always looked off somehow. The second one was top-heavy. I just could not figure out how to fix it. The third one was lumpy and awkward, and not even worth trying to fix. I just didn’t like the fourth one…it might’ve been fine, Just not what I was aiming for. Ho hum. Oh well. Back to do more research.

Family BugsI came across this gorgeous pattern from Skopa Och Inreda, which I guess is Swedish for Create and Decoration. It was a bit challenging for me to figure out, since the whole blog is written in not English, but straight-forward enough that I could figure it out ok with some google translate.

For example…V 7: at the beginning of each row skip understood the mesh so that the work reduces a mesh width of each row 15, 14, 13 and so on until there are only three stitches. (Each row ends as usual with an air mesh). Of course, that makes no sense. But my smartie brain was able to figure out that she is talking about ROW 7: at the beginning of each row, skip one stitch (or sc2tog, which is what I did) so that the width reduces by one stitch for each row until there are only three stitches left. Each row ends with a ch 1.
FamilyBugs So, if you can get past the linguistics and peculiar word translations, it is a beautiful pattern and well-worth your time. My other complaint, though, is how large the owl ended up being. It is hard to tell from the pictures provided on the blog, but it is HUGE! There are some instructions for making the owl smaller (which I will be following when I make this again), but it was an unfamiliar pattern so I didn’t want to further confuse and frustrate myself. Overall, I think this owl pattern is adorable, I just wouldn’t recommend it to the American beginner crochet artist.

How To Manage Bulk Orders


Rabbit&Fox BoxCrochet is not a quick craft. It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been doing it, or how fast you can work. It’s still gonna require a sizeable investment of time to crochet something. Sure there are “mile a minute” blankets, and “hour long” scarf patterns, and several projects that brag about the limited time to complete them. But if you are ever in a situation where you are asked to make just 10 of these, it’s going to take up the better part of two days, and maybe even a couple of weeks depending on your schedule.

A couple of months ago, I started working with a dear friend making her these cute little woodland animals. She purchases them from me at the absolute lowest price possible and adds them to similarly themed products from other artisans. She then sells these collections at a marked-up price for a profit. Rabbit and Fox box. Absolutely adorable stuff, definitely worth your attention! I do not offer these patterns for sale, and I do not allow the animals to be purchased from me. They are exclusives!

So, I’ve got to work up about 12 of these tiny creatures, owls this time, and I want to do it as fast as I can (mostly so I don’t get bored and can keep moving forward). Each individual animal may take me an hour, maybe two to complete from start to finish. While you might expect me to spend an entire week working on these (the math comes out to approximately 30 hours of work), I can usually finish them in 3 days, or about 10 hours. There is one secret and only one for how I manage this magic: assembly line!

  Alright, are you listening? This is how I made twelve little owls in three days:

  1. Purchase the desired colors
  2. Gather ALL of my materials in a box (for easy clean-up, and to keep them all together)
  3. Make 20 tiny wings
  4. Make 20 white circles
  5. Whip stitch the circles together, embroider the eyes
  6. Make an owl head
  7. Add on the eyes and embroider the beak
  8. Finish the owl’s body attaching the wings as I go
  9. Repeat steps 6-8 until they are all completed

If I were making one owl at a time I would be repeating steps 3-8. Six steps is a lot more time consuming than three (by more than twice). Especially when you take into account the putting down of one color in order to pick up the next color, and locating the yarn end, and finding the needle, and re-threading every single color for the embroidery, and all of those tiny in between actions. By creating each part at a time, I can better utilize my time and complete this bulk order at a faster pace. I can embroider all of the eyes at the same time, thus eliminating the painful re-threading of the needle. I can establish a rhythm for making all of the wings and shave even more time off of my creation process (I noticed, especially while I was making the wings, that each one took 3-4 seconds faster than the previous one). Tiny parts of creating one owl can be lessened or even eliminated altogether by using the assembly line process.

The Calculations

Crocheting in BulkSo that there cannot be any arguments or confusion, I even used a stop watch to calculate it all out for you. To make one owl all the way to completion took me 57 minutes. Multiply that by 12, and we can round it up to 12 hours. Whereas by using my assembly line method, I could crank out 12 eyes in 52 minutes, 24 wings in 31 minutes, and finish up 12 owls in about 6.5 hours. Meaning 12 owls took a total of 8 hours! By using the assembly line method, I was able to knock 4 hours off of the creation time. Now, I can spend that time on my packaging, or on writing a blog post about it, or on more crochet projects ☺

It did take me a little bit longer than 8 hours to make these, because of distractions, and a badly wound skein of yarn that kept tangling, and having to stop and hit the “lap” button on my stop watch, and having to make a few extras to get accurate calculations. But, I think I’ve made my point!

So, the next time you have someone ask for a whole bunch of one crochet item, don’t forget to “assembly line” it where you can. Your brain will thank you for it!

Basic Beanie Free Crochet Pattern 2.0!


img_0854UPDATED (March 4, 2014)

Free crochet patterns for EVERY beanie size you could possibly want from Preemie all the way up to adult large.  My originally posted corhcet patterns for these beanies can be found HERE, just in case you are interested, but seeing as it was one of my earlier crochet patterns ever written, it is quite poor in quality and understand-ability (sure, that can be a word).  So, I re-worked my crochet pattern and now have it available to the public!

Stitches required

  • Ch – Chain – Yo, pull through
  • Ss – Slip Stitch – Insert hook, Yo, pull through both loops on hook
  • Dc – Double Crochet – Yo, Insert hook, yo, pull through, yo, pull through two loops on hook, yo, pull through remaining two loops
  • Inc – Work 2 Dc both into the next stitch

Materials Needed

Starting off with these basic beanie crochet patterns you could make all sorts of different hats: striped, mohawk, owl, monster, with earflaps, newsie, simple, with flowers…And, as always, if you have any questions about any of these, or need any help along the way, please do not hesitate to shoot me an email {familybugs (AT) gmail (DOT) com}.

Please note that the Ch 2 that occurs at the beginning of each round does NOT EVER count as a dc stitch throughout the crochet patterns.

These patterns are based off of the measurements taken from Bev’s Size chart, if you aren’t sure about sizing measurements…well, I’ve included that too!
Clover “Shiro” Tape Measure

  • Newborn: Head Circumference 13″ – 14 ”  33-36cm; hat circ = 11.5″ – 13″ Hat height = 5.5 to 6″ 13-15 cm
  • Baby – 3 to 6 months: Head Circumference: 14″ – 17 ”  36-43 cm; Hat height= 6.5 – 7″ 15-18 cm
  • Baby – 6 to 12 months: Head Circumference: 16″ – 19 ”  41-48 cm ;  Hat height = 7.5″  18 cm
  • Toddler – preschooler (12 months – 3 years): Head Circumference: 18″ to 20 ” 46 -48 cm; Hat height = 8″  20 cm
  • Child (3 – 10 years): Head Circumference: 19″ – 20 1/2″  48-51 cm; Hat height =8.5″  22cm
  • Pre-teens and Teens  Hat: Head Circumference: 20 1/2″ – 22″   53 -56 cm; height 9-10″  25 cm
  • Adult Woman: Head Circumference:  21.5″ – 22.5″  Hat height = 11″
  • Adult Man: Head Circumference:  23″ – 24″  58.4 cm – 61 cm; Hat height = 11″-11.5″

Gauge Swatch – This is used to determine if your tension and hook is going to create a similarly sized product at the end.  After completing this, if your swatch measures larger, you might want to choose a smaller hook and complete another gauge swatch.  If your swatch measures smaller, choose a larger hook and try again.
Ch 16
ROW 1: Sc in second ch from hook and all the way across (15) Ch 2, turn.
ROW 2: Dc all the way across (15) Ch 1, turn.
ROWs 3, 5: Repeat Row 1
ROWs 4, 6: Repeat Row 2
Finish off.  Swatch should measure pretty close to 5.5” X 3

Why double crochet? You might ask.  Well, double crochet is fast, relatively easy, and I think that it still results in a really warm product.  The looser stitches trap more air between the fibers and air is an incredible insulator (that is if you can trap it)!  Also, the looser stitching will result in a hat that has more stretch and give to it, which is more likely to fit all sorts of head shapes and sizes 😀  So, ENJOY!!

Feel free to use and distribute the finished hats however you would like, I don’t mind finished hats being sold from these patterns (That’s what I do with them), or for charity purposes, or auctions…or personal use…turn it upside down and use it as a bowl, add some handles and use it as a bag…skies the limit!

Preemie Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT counts as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc (21) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (28). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

Newborn Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 16 dc (16). Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc (24) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 2 (32) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (32). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

0-3 Month Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc (21) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 3 (35) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 6-8: Repeat RND 5.

3-6 Month Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc (21) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 3 (35) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

6-12 Month Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 16 dc (16). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc (24) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, repeat the follwoing all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 2 (32) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2,repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 3 (40) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (40). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

12-24 Month Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc (21) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 3 (35) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 4 (42) Ss to first to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 7-10: Repeat RND 6.

img_08533-10 Years Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc (21) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 3 (35) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 4 (42) Ss to first to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 7-11: Repeat RND 6.

Preteen – Teen Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 16 dc (16). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc (24) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 2 (32) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 3 (40) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 4 (48) Ss to first to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 5 (56). Ss to first to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (56). Ss to first to join.

baby newborn preemie adult large small teenRNDS 8-12: Repeat RND 7.

Adult Small Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 16 dc (16). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc (24) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 2 (32) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 3 (40) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2,Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 4 (48) Ss to first to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 5 (56) Ss to first to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (56). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 8-14: Repeat RND 7.

Adult Large Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc (21) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 3 (35) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 4 (42) Ss to first to join.

RND 6: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 5 (49) Ss to first to join.

RND 7: (Last Increasing round) Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 6 (56). Ss to first to join.

RND 8: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (56). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 9-15: Repeat RND 8.

Basic Earflap Beanie Free Crochet Pattern


Free crochetpatterns for EVERY earflap beanie size you could possibly want from Preemie all the way up to adult large.  All you need to know is chain stitch, slip stitch, single crochet, and double crochet.   If you have access to some yarn and a J sized crochet hook, you are ready to go.  Starting off with these basic patterns you could make all sorts of different hats: striped, mohawk, owl, monster, newsie, simple, with flowers…And, as always, if you have any questions about any of these, or need any help along the way, please do not hesitate to shoot me an email {familybugs (AT) gmail (DOT) com}

Last updated: June 2, 2018

Red Heart Super Saver
The 12 BEST CROCHET HOOKS SET WITH ERGONOMIC HANDLES FOR EXTREME COMFORT
Clover “Shiro” Tape Measure

These patterns are based off of the measurements taken from Bev’s Size chart, if you aren’t sure about sizing measurements…well, I’ve included that too!

  • Newborn: Head Circumference 13″ – 14 ”  33-36cm
  • Baby – 3 to 6 months: Head Circumference: 14″ – 17 ”  36-43 cm
  • Baby – 6 to 12 months: Head Circumference: 16″ – 19 ”  41-48 cm
  • Toddler – preschooler (12 months – 3 years): Head Circumference: 18″ to 20 ” 46 -48 cm
  • Child (3 – 10 years): Head Circumference: 19″ – 20 1/2″  48-51 cm
  • Pre-teens and Teens  Hat: Head Circumference: 20 1/2″ – 22″   53 -56 cm
  • Adult Woman: Head Circumference:  21.5″ – 22.5″
  • Adult Man: Head Circumference:  23″ – 24″  58.4 cm – 61 cm

Why double crochet? You might ask.  Well, double crochet is fast, relatively easy, and I think that it still results in a really warm product.  The looser stitches trap more air between the fibers and air is an incredible insulator (that is if you can trap it)!  Also, the looser stitching will result in a hat that has more stretch and give to it, which is more likely to fit all sorts of head shapes and sizes 😀  So, ENJOY!!

Feel free to use and distribute this pattern however you would like, I don’t mind finished hats being sold from these patterns (That’s what I do with them), or for charity purposes, or auctions…or personal use…turn it upside down and use it as a bowl, add some handles and use it as a bag…skies the limit!

Instructions for Dc2tog stitch:

YO, Insert hook into first stitch, YO, pull through, YO, pull through two loops on hook (half of a double crochet has been completed, NOTE:  This is NOT a hdc stitch, it is half of a double crochet).  YO, Insert hook into next stitch, YO, pull through, YO pull through two loops on hook (half of another double crochet stitch has been completed).  YO, pull through all remaining loops on hook.

Preemie Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (28). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 7 stitches (8).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.  For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.  Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

Newborn Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (32). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 7 stitches (8).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.  For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.  Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

0-3 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next.  (3:2 ration, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-8: Repeat RND 5.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 7 stitches (8).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.  For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.  Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

3-6 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 9 stitches (10).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.  For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.  Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

6-12 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (40). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 9 stitches (10).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.  For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.  Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

12-24 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 7-10: Repeat RND 6.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 9 stitches (10).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.  For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.  Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

3-10 Years Size

With K hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 7-11: Repeat RND 6.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 9 stitches (10).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.  For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.  Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

Preteen – Teen Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (48) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next five spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

baby newborn preemie adult large small teenRNDS 8-12: Repeat RND 7.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 11 stitches (12).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 8 stitches, dc2tog (10).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 7: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.  For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.  Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

Adult Small Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (48) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next five spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 8-14: Repeat RND 7.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 11 stitches (12).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 8 stitches, dc2tog (10).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 7: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.  For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.  Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

Adult Large Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next five spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). (49) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: (Last Increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next six spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (6:2 ratio, 1 dc in six stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 8: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 9-15: Repeat RND 8.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 11 stitches (12).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 8 stitches, dc2tog (10).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 7: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.  For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.  Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

Starting up a Selling Business, Part 2 – Narrow down the Niche


So, you’ve decided which craft you want to sell.  YAY!  That’s the first step in starting off your own selling business.  Now, just keep on trucking to the next step: Narrow down the niche.  If you are brand spanking new to this whole selling idea, you probably have no clue what a niche even is.  Well, let’s start with the dictionary.com definition of a niche: a distinct segment of a market.  Yeah, that never helped me understand it either.

crochet newborn photo prop
The ever popular owl hat!

How about an example of what a niche is?  Let’s say that you have chosen sewing as your craft.  Then you narrow it down to clothing.  Narrow it down a little bit further to dresses.  Keep going to get maxi dresses.  Go a little bit further and you might have every-day casual maxi dresses.  You can even go narrower than that and have graphic screen printed casual maxi dresses.  THAT is what a niche market is.  You go down as narrow and as small as you possibly can so that you target a smaller clientele base.

Now I bet you are wondering: “Why would I want a smaller clientele base?  Isn’t it better to market to as many people as possible?”  Well, maybe to begin with, but not for long-term success.  Just think of everyone that you would have to be competing with.  A narrower market is going to make you unique, and you will stand out, and customers are going to know: If they want your specific product, then you are the person, and the only person, that is available to purchase from.  You can charge a little bit more for your product, and it is going to be a little bit easier to advertise your product.
Now, there are some people out there who may want to argue the efficiency of a niche market.  Personally, I like to do a little bit of everything: I sell generic products (a blue crochet scarf), I sell popular products (crochet owl hats), and then I also sell very specific and unique products (superhero crochet patterns).  I think that those specific and unique products bring in a loyal customer following, and the generic products will get you the random sale (when you can offer the best price and service), and those popular products will always sell to the person who sees your product before they see anyone else offering the same thing (think about marketing to people face-to-face who don’t peruse pinterest on a regular basis).  Having a niche certainly will not hurt your selling, and can really, continue to benefit your craft-selling business!

Follow my blog to get email updates for the rest of this series on how to start up your own craft-selling business, and don’t forget to like this post if you’ve found it useful!!

Part 1, choosing your craft

Part 2, narrowing down the niche

Part 3, where to sell

Part 4, set up shop

Part 5, keep on keeping on

 

 

Starting up a Selling Business, Part 1 – Choosing your craft


You’ve seen the craft shows and have thought to yourself: Well, I could do that!  Or maybe you’ve been on pinterest, and have seen all the super cute and simple crafts, and have decided: I want to make those and then sell it!  Maybe, you are like me, and you really want to do something to supplement your spouse’s income without having to sacrifice your other

English: Photo of the craft centre at Erpingha...
Craft centre at Erpingham, Norfolk

responsibilities (kids, other job, etc.).  So, you’ve decided to start selling your hand-made crafts.  Excellent idea!  Crafts are easy to make, relatively cheap to make, and people will buy them.  But where on earth do you start?  I encourage you to follow along on my 5 part series on how to start up your own selling business.

First of all, I want to encourage you that you most certainly can do it!  Anyone can do it.  I am here to help you do it.  So long as you have a craft, and are wiling to put forth a little bit of time and energy, and you *want* to do it.

This brings us to the part 1 of the series, you have to choose your craft.  There are so very many different crafts that are available to you, and there are several things to consider when you are starting up your business as to the *what* part of the craft selling business.

  1. Where are your talents?  If your strength is in the needle arts, it might not be such a wise decision to sell painted canvasses.  Which art style do you feel the most experienced and accomplished in?  Start with what you know, and then as your craft selling builds and stabilizes you can branch out and experiment with different styles and mediums.
  2. What sort of materials are readily available to you?  Different cities have different stores, have different materials.  I don’t have a whole lot of luxurious yarns available to me.  I cannot readily offer alpaca yarn, or felted wool shawls.  I also do not have access to a loom, or spinner.  I cannot sell hand-spun yarns.  Make sure, before you offer a product, that you have access to the materials that you will need in order to make it.
  3. Be reasonable.  I love to paint, but with three relatively small children (2 preschoolers and a toddler right now), painting is just not a reasonable craft for me.  I can’t just drop my paint brush and rush to the aid of a child.  So, I sell a craft that works with the unpredictability that comes with younger children.  Realizing what you are able to create in your unique circumstances will save you a lot of stress and possibly wasted materials.
  4. What do you enjoy making?  Maybe you are an amazing seamstress, but the idea of sewing the same style dress over and over again seems so incredible boring!  Whereas unique one-of-a-kind statement jewelry is something different with each and every product.

There are so many different crafts out there, and so many of them come with free tutorials and patterns online.  Of course, to be really successful you will have to create something different and unique to you, but it isn’t a bad idea to start off with something common.  Go ahead and start off with owl themes.  They are popular and they are selling right now.  But don’t stick with JUST owls, because everyone and their grandmother is selling owls (which makes for a TON of competition), and trends change so in a few months, owls will be out and something else will be in.

Follow my blog to get email updates for the rest of this series on how to start up your own craft-selling business, and don’t forget to like this post if you’ve found it useful!!

Part 1, choosing your craft

Part 2, narrowing down the niche

Part 3, where to sell

Part 4, set up shop

Part 5, keep on keeping on

 

 

Basic Beanie Free Crochet Pattern


An updated version of this pattern can be found HERE

Free crochet patterns for EVERY beanie size you could possibly want from Preemie all the way up to adult large.  All you need to know is chain stitch, slip stitch, and double crochet.   If you have access to some yarn and a J sized crochet hook, you are ready to go.  Starting off with these basic patterns you could make all sorts of different hats: striped, mohawk, owl, monster, with earflaps, newsie, simple, with flowers…And, as always, if you have any questions about any of these, or need any help along the way, please do not hesitate to shoot me an email {familybugs (AT) gmail (DOT) com}

Red Heart Super Saver
The 12 BEST CROCHET HOOKS SET WITH ERGONOMIC HANDLES FOR EXTREME COMFORT
Clover “Shiro” Tape Measure

These patterns are based off of the measurements taken from Bev’s Size chart, if you aren’t sure about sizing measurements…well, I’ve included that too!

  • Newborn: Head Circumference 13″ – 14 ”  33-36cm; hat circ = 11.5″ – 13″ Hat height = 5.5 to 6″ 13-15 cm
  • Baby – 3 to 6 months: Head Circumference: 14″ – 17 ”  36-43 cm; Hat height= 6.5 – 7″ 15-18 cm
  • Baby – 6 to 12 months: Head Circumference: 16″ – 19 ”  41-48 cm ;  Hat height = 7.5″  18 cm
  • Toddler – preschooler (12 months – 3 years): Head Circumference: 18″ to 20 ” 46 -48 cm; Hat height = 8″  20 cm
  • Child (3 – 10 years): Head Circumference: 19″ – 20 1/2″  48-51 cm; Hat height =8.5″  22cm
  • Pre-teens and Teens  Hat: Head Circumference: 20 1/2″ – 22″   53 -56 cm; height 9-10″  25 cm
  • Adult Woman: Head Circumference:  21.5″ – 22.5″  Hat height = 11″
  • Adult Man: Head Circumference:  23″ – 24″  58.4 cm – 61 cm; Hat height = 11″-11.5″

Why double crochet? You might ask.  Well, double crochet is fast, relatively easy, and I think that it still results in a really warm product.  The looser stitches trap more air between the fibers and air is an incredible insulator (that is if you can trap it)!  Also, the looser stitching will result in a hat that has more stretch and give to it, which is more likely to fit all sorts of head shapes and sizes 😀  So, ENJOY!!

Feel free to use and distribute this pattern however you would like, I don’t mind finished hats being sold from these patterns (That’s what I do with them), or for charity purposes, or auctions…or personal use…turn it upside down and use it as a bowl, add some handles and use it as a bag…skies the limit!

Preemie Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (28). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

Newborn Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (32). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

0-3 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next.  (3:2 ration, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-8: Repeat RND 5.

3-6 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

6-12 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (40). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

12-24 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 7-10: Repeat RND 6.

3-10 Years Size

With K hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 7-11: Repeat RND 6.

Preteen – Teen Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (48) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next five spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

baby newborn preemie adult large small teenRNDS 8-12: Repeat RND 7.

Adult Small Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (48) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 8-14: Repeat RND 7.

Adult Large Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next five spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). (49) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: (Last Increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next six spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (6:2 ratio, 1 dc in six stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 8: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 9-15: Repeat RND 8.

Charity/Fundraising


Latino Children Play Swing
Latino Children Play Swing (Photo credit: epSos.de)

Having a cause.  Knowing that all of your hard work can go to benefit someone else.  Not being selfish.  Giving back to the community.  Encourage others to help in whatever way that they can.  Creating an outlet for others to help.  Serving God in some little ways.

Products to a service (redcross, special olympics), for a fundraiser (in my case Sacred Selections Adoption aid), or a portion of proceeds.  For a sepcific friend/family member, a similar situation (close to your heart), or just to do something nice.

There are countless reasons, methods, ways that you can participate in a charity or fundraiser.  Some may argue that it isn’t logical to do this because you lose revenue/profit.  Some may argue that you need to do this, because of ethical or moral obligations.  I’ve heard some argue that it’s a good idea to do this because it might increase sales, giving others an extra reason to purchase your product apart from the idea that they just like it.

texas our texas
texas our texas (Photo credit: jmtimages)

Whatever your reason, method, way, or argument, that isn’t really my concern for this particular post.  Once again, I’m diving into the realm of “personal” to tell you a story.

There are these three sibblings.  A boy, aged 5, another boy, aged 4, and a little girl, aged 2.  I don’t know their story, really haven’t even bothered to ask.  All I know is that they need to be adopted, and there is a Christian couple going through the process to do just that.  I’m sure you’ve heard rumored that adopting one child is super expensive.  I imagine the cost is equivalent to having a baby yourself, except without insurance and more hoops to jump through (with name changes, legal stuff, attorneys, getting other tedious things taken care of).  So, adopting three children is sort of like paying for college (again, without the student loans).

Every year, there is a fundraising event held in the western TN area, and this year, their goal is to help this couple adopt these three adorable (and happy) children.  Seeing as I am located in the western TX area (notice that one letter change that makes the difference from Tennessee to Texas), I donated some items to be auctioned off.  It really wasn’t much, an estimated equivalent of $100.  Stuff from my inventory that I never expected to sell anyways (Since I do mostly made-to-order, most of my inventory is examples of stuff that I can make with the options of size and colors).  6 products that are pictured below.

However, in a situation like this, every little bit helps.  And along with my contribution, this fundraiser was able to raise over $20,000 (the goal was $18,000)!  I don’t know how much my products were able to help, don’t know if they were auctioned off at their normal selling price.  But frankly, does it really matter?  Three incredible children are now being given the opportunity to be part of a God-fearing family with a better hope for the future.

Go and see what’s for sale right now on my website! (Hint: Click the picture)

familybugs.net
http://www.familybugs.net

Join up with me on facebook for great deals, sneak peaks, and exclusive offers!

facebook.com/familybugs
http://www.fb.com/familybugs

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