Basic Beanie Free Crochet Pattern 2.0!


img_0854UPDATED (March 4, 2014)

Free crochet patterns for EVERY beanie size you could possibly want from Preemie all the way up to adult large.  My originally posted corhcet patterns for these beanies can be found HERE, just in case you are interested, but seeing as it was one of my earlier crochet patterns ever written, it is quite poor in quality and understand-ability (sure, that can be a word).  So, I re-worked my crochet pattern and now have it available to the public!

Stitches required

  • Ch – Chain – Yo, pull through
  • Ss – Slip Stitch – Insert hook, Yo, pull through both loops on hook
  • Dc – Double Crochet – Yo, Insert hook, yo, pull through, yo, pull through two loops on hook, yo, pull through remaining two loops
  • Inc – Work 2 Dc both into the next stitch

Materials Needed

Starting off with these basic beanie crochet patterns you could make all sorts of different hats: striped, mohawk, owl, monster, with earflaps, newsie, simple, with flowers…And, as always, if you have any questions about any of these, or need any help along the way, please do not hesitate to shoot me an email {familybugs (AT) gmail (DOT) com}.

Please note that the Ch 2 that occurs at the beginning of each round does NOT EVER count as a dc stitch throughout the crochet patterns.

These patterns are based off of the measurements taken from Bev’s Size chart, if you aren’t sure about sizing measurements…well, I’ve included that too!
Clover “Shiro” Tape Measure

  • Newborn: Head Circumference 13″ – 14 ”  33-36cm; hat circ = 11.5″ – 13″ Hat height = 5.5 to 6″ 13-15 cm
  • Baby – 3 to 6 months: Head Circumference: 14″ – 17 ”  36-43 cm; Hat height= 6.5 – 7″ 15-18 cm
  • Baby – 6 to 12 months: Head Circumference: 16″ – 19 ”  41-48 cm ;  Hat height = 7.5″  18 cm
  • Toddler – preschooler (12 months – 3 years): Head Circumference: 18″ to 20 ” 46 -48 cm; Hat height = 8″  20 cm
  • Child (3 – 10 years): Head Circumference: 19″ – 20 1/2″  48-51 cm; Hat height =8.5″  22cm
  • Pre-teens and Teens  Hat: Head Circumference: 20 1/2″ – 22″   53 -56 cm; height 9-10″  25 cm
  • Adult Woman: Head Circumference:  21.5″ – 22.5″  Hat height = 11″
  • Adult Man: Head Circumference:  23″ – 24″  58.4 cm – 61 cm; Hat height = 11″-11.5″

Gauge Swatch – This is used to determine if your tension and hook is going to create a similarly sized product at the end.  After completing this, if your swatch measures larger, you might want to choose a smaller hook and complete another gauge swatch.  If your swatch measures smaller, choose a larger hook and try again.
Ch 16
ROW 1: Sc in second ch from hook and all the way across (15) Ch 2, turn.
ROW 2: Dc all the way across (15) Ch 1, turn.
ROWs 3, 5: Repeat Row 1
ROWs 4, 6: Repeat Row 2
Finish off.  Swatch should measure pretty close to 5.5‚ÄĚ X 3

Why double crochet? You might ask.  Well, double crochet is fast, relatively easy, and I think that it still results in a really warm product.  The looser stitches trap more air between the fibers and air is an incredible insulator (that is if you can trap it)!  Also, the looser stitching will result in a hat that has more stretch and give to it, which is more likely to fit all sorts of head shapes and sizes ūüėÄ  So, ENJOY!!

Feel free to use and distribute the finished hats however you would like, I don’t mind finished hats being sold from these patterns (That’s what I do with them), or for charity purposes, or auctions…or personal use…turn it upside down and use it as a bowl, add some handles and use it as a bag…skies the limit!

Preemie Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT counts as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc (21) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (28). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

Newborn Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 16 dc (16). Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc (24) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 2 (32) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (32). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

0-3 Month Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc (21) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Slip stitch to first to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 3 (35) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 6-8: Repeat RND 5.

3-6 Month Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc (21) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 3 (35) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

6-12 Month Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 16 dc (16). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc (24) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, repeat the follwoing all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 2 (32) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2,repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 3 (40) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (40). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

12-24 Month Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc (21) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 3 (35) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 4 (42) Ss to first to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 7-10: Repeat RND 6.

img_08533-10 Years Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc (21) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 3 (35) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 4 (42) Ss to first to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 7-11: Repeat RND 6.

Preteen – Teen Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 16 dc (16). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc (24) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 2 (32) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 3 (40) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 4 (48) Ss to first to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 5 (56). Ss to first to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (56). Ss to first to join.

baby newborn preemie adult large small teenRNDS 8-12: Repeat RND 7.

Adult Small Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 16 dc (16). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc (24) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 2 (32) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 3 (40) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2,Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 4 (48) Ss to first to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (8 times): Inc, dc 5 (56) Ss to first to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (56). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 8-14: Repeat RND 7.

Adult Large Size

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 14 dc (14). Ss to first to join.

RND 2: Ch 2 (does NOT count as dc here or throughout). Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc (21) Ss to first to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 2 (28) Ss to first to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 3 (35) Ss to first to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 4 (42) Ss to first to join.

RND 6: Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 5 (49) Ss to first to join.

RND 7: (Last Increasing round) Ch 2, Repeat the following all the way around (7 times): Inc, dc 6 (56). Ss to first to join.

RND 8: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (56). Ss to first to join.

RNDS 9-15: Repeat RND 8.

Basic Earflap Beanie Free Crochet Pattern


Free¬†crochetpatterns for EVERY earflap beanie size you could possibly want from Preemie all the way up to adult large. ¬†All you need to know is chain stitch, slip stitch, single crochet, and double crochet. ¬† If you have access to some yarn and a J sized crochet hook, you are ready to go. ¬†Starting off with these basic patterns you could make all sorts of different hats: striped, mohawk, owl, monster, newsie, simple, with flowers…And, as always, if you have any questions about any of these, or need any help along the way, please do not hesitate to shoot me an email {familybugs (AT) gmail (DOT) com}

Last updated: June 2, 2018

Red Heart Super Saver
The 12 BEST CROCHET HOOKS SET WITH ERGONOMIC HANDLES FOR EXTREME COMFORT
Clover “Shiro” Tape Measure

These patterns are based off of the measurements taken from Bev’s Size chart, if you aren’t sure about sizing measurements…well, I’ve included that too!

  • Newborn: Head Circumference 13″ – 14 ”¬†¬†33-36cm
  • Baby – 3 to 6 months:¬†Head Circumference: 14″ – 17 ”¬†¬†36-43 cm
  • Baby – 6 to 12 months:¬†Head Circumference: 16″ – 19 ” ¬†41-48 cm
  • Toddler – preschooler (12 months – 3 years):¬†Head Circumference: 18″ to 20 ”¬†46 -48 cm
  • Child (3 – 10 years):¬†Head Circumference: 19″ – 20 1/2″¬†¬†48-51 cm
  • Pre-teens and Teens¬† Hat:¬†Head Circumference: 20 1/2″ – 22″¬†¬†¬†53 -56 cm
  • Adult Woman:¬†Head Circumference:¬† 21.5″ – 22.5″
  • Adult Man:¬†Head Circumference:¬† 23″ – 24″¬†¬†58.4 cm – 61 cm

Why double crochet? You might ask. ¬†Well, double crochet is fast, relatively easy, and I think that it still results in a really warm product. ¬†The looser stitches trap more air between the fibers and air is an incredible insulator (that is if you can trap it)! ¬†Also, the looser stitching will result in a hat that has more stretch and give to it, which is more likely to fit all sorts of head shapes and sizes ūüėÄ ¬†So, ENJOY!!

Feel free to use and distribute this pattern however you would like, I don’t mind finished hats being sold from these patterns (That’s what I do with them), or for charity purposes, or auctions…or personal use…turn it upside down and use it as a bowl, add some handles and use it as a bag…skies the limit!

Instructions for Dc2tog stitch:

YO, Insert hook into first stitch, YO, pull through, YO, pull through two loops on hook (half of a double crochet has been completed, NOTE:  This is NOT a hdc stitch, it is half of a double crochet).  YO, Insert hook into next stitch, YO, pull through, YO pull through two loops on hook (half of another double crochet stitch has been completed).  YO, pull through all remaining loops on hook.

Preemie Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (28). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 7 stitches (8).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.¬† For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.¬† Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

Newborn Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (32). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 7 stitches (8).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.¬† For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.¬† Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

0-3 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next.  (3:2 ration, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-8: Repeat RND 5.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 7 stitches (8).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.¬† For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.¬† Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

3-6 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 9 stitches (10).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.¬† For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.¬† Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

6-12 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (40). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 9 stitches (10).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.¬† For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.¬† Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

12-24 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 7-10: Repeat RND 6.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 9 stitches (10).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.¬† For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.¬† Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

3-10 Years Size

With K hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 7-11: Repeat RND 6.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 9 stitches (10).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.¬† For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.¬† Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

Preteen – Teen Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (48) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next five spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

baby newborn preemie adult large small teenRNDS 8-12: Repeat RND 7.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 11 stitches (12).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 8 stitches, dc2tog (10).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 7: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.¬† For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.¬† Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

Adult Small Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (48) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next five spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 8-14: Repeat RND 7.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 11 stitches (12).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 8 stitches, dc2tog (10).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 7: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.¬† For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.¬† Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

Adult Large Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next five spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). (49) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: (Last Increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next six spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (6:2 ratio, 1 dc in six stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 8: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 9-15: Repeat RND 8.

Earflap, repeat on both sides of hat

ROW 1: Insert hook, Ch 2, dc in same stitch and in next 11 stitches (12).

ROW 2: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 8 stitches, dc2tog (10).

ROW 3: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 6 stitches, dc2tog (8).

ROW 4: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 4 stitches, dc2tog (6).

ROW 5: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog, dc in next 2 stitches, dc2tog (4).

ROW 6: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog twice (2).

ROW 7: Ch 2, turn.  Dc2tog (1), finish off.

For a clean look, sc around the entire hat.¬† For the earflaps, make sure to sc 2 into the side of each dc.¬† Add a braided tassel at the “peak” of each earflap to finish it off!

Basic Beanie Free Crochet Pattern


An updated version of this pattern can be found HERE

Free crochet patterns for EVERY beanie size you could possibly want from Preemie all the way up to adult large.  All you need to know is chain stitch, slip stitch, and double crochet.   If you have access to some yarn and a J sized crochet hook, you are ready to go.  Starting off with these basic patterns you could make all sorts of different hats: striped, mohawk, owl, monster, with earflaps, newsie, simple, with flowers…And, as always, if you have any questions about any of these, or need any help along the way, please do not hesitate to shoot me an email {familybugs (AT) gmail (DOT) com}

Red Heart Super Saver
The 12 BEST CROCHET HOOKS SET WITH ERGONOMIC HANDLES FOR EXTREME COMFORT
Clover “Shiro” Tape Measure

These patterns are based off of the measurements taken from Bev’s Size chart, if you aren’t sure about sizing measurements…well, I’ve included that too!

  • Newborn: Head Circumference 13″ – 14 ”  33-36cm; hat circ = 11.5″ – 13″ Hat height = 5.5 to 6″ 13-15 cm
  • Baby – 3 to 6 months: Head Circumference: 14″ – 17 ”  36-43 cm; Hat height= 6.5 – 7″ 15-18 cm
  • Baby – 6 to 12 months: Head Circumference: 16″ – 19 ”  41-48 cm ;  Hat height = 7.5″  18 cm
  • Toddler – preschooler (12 months – 3 years): Head Circumference: 18″ to 20 ” 46 -48 cm; Hat height = 8″  20 cm
  • Child (3 – 10 years): Head Circumference: 19″ – 20 1/2″  48-51 cm; Hat height =8.5″  22cm
  • Pre-teens and Teens  Hat: Head Circumference: 20 1/2″ – 22″   53 -56 cm; height 9-10″  25 cm
  • Adult Woman: Head Circumference:  21.5″ – 22.5″  Hat height = 11″
  • Adult Man: Head Circumference:  23″ – 24″  58.4 cm – 61 cm; Hat height = 11″-11.5″

Why double crochet? You might ask.  Well, double crochet is fast, relatively easy, and I think that it still results in a really warm product.  The looser stitches trap more air between the fibers and air is an incredible insulator (that is if you can trap it)!  Also, the looser stitching will result in a hat that has more stretch and give to it, which is more likely to fit all sorts of head shapes and sizes ūüėÄ  So, ENJOY!!

Feel free to use and distribute this pattern however you would like, I don’t mind finished hats being sold from these patterns (That’s what I do with them), or for charity purposes, or auctions…or personal use…turn it upside down and use it as a bowl, add some handles and use it as a bag…skies the limit!

Preemie Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (28). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

Newborn Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (32). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 5-7: Repeat RND 4.

0-3 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next.  (3:2 ration, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-8: Repeat RND 5.

3-6 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (35). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

6-12 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: (Last increasing round). Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (40). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 6-9: Repeat RND 5.

12-24 Month Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 7-10: Repeat RND 6.

3-10 Years Size

With K hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around (42). Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 7-11: Repeat RND 6.

Preteen – Teen Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (48) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next five spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

baby newborn preemie adult large small teenRNDS 8-12: Repeat RND 7.

Adult Small Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 15 more dc (16). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (24) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 15 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (32) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (40) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (48) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: (Last increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 14 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 8-14: Repeat RND 7.

Adult Large Size

With J hook

RND 1: Ch 3. In 3rd chain from hook work 13 more dc (14). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2.

RND 2: Ch 2 (counts as dc here and throughout). Dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in next space, work 2 dc in the next space. (Like a 1:2 ratio, 1 dc in one stitch, 2 dc in the next). (21) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 3: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next two spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (this one is a 2:2 ratio, 1 dc in two stitches, 2 dc in the next). (28) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 4: Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next three spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (3:2 ratio, 1 dc in three stitches, 2 dc in the next). (35) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 5: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next four spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (4:2 ratio, 1 dc in four stitches, 2 dc in the next). (42) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 6: Ch 2, dc in same stitch.  (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next five spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (5:2 ratio, 1 dc in five stitches, 2 dc in the next). (49) Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 7: (Last Increasing round) Ch 2, dc in same stitch. (Repeat the following 13 times) Dc in the next six spaces, work 2 dc in the next. (6:2 ratio, 1 dc in six stitches, 2 dc in the next). Slip stitch to the top of the ch 2 to join.

RND 8: Ch 2 and dc in each stitch around. Slip stitch to top of ch 2 to join.

RNDS 9-15: Repeat RND 8.

For the needle art-er (part 2)


Detail of Image:Sampler by Elizabeth Laidman, ...
Detail of Image:Sampler by Elizabeth Laidman, 1760.jpg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We have already discussed the wide variety of crafts that needle art covers, but as a quick review: “Needlework is a broad term for the handicrafts of decorative sewing and textile arts. Anything that uses a needle for construction can be called needlework. The definition may expand to include related textile crafts such as a crochet hook or tatting shuttles.” Which covers the following: crochet, knitting, cross stitch, smocking, embroidery, felting and others.

Last post in this series, I focused on crochet, knitting, and felting. This post I want to focus on the other needle arts: cross stitch, smocking, and embroidery. Cross stitching is often done on a very specific type of material that has little holes in a grid-like pattern, but can really be done in any material. Using a needle and some embroidery thread, the crafter makes little crosses and basically pixels an image or text into the material. Smocking is similar to cross stitching except that it is done on material that has been pleated. Embroidery is also similar to cross stitching but without the cross-action, and can be hand embroidered or machine embroidery.

There is lots that you can sell that is related to these three crafts of the needle arts, so let’s get to brainstorming!

  • Clothing accents – Little details on necklines, hemlines, or pockets to change a plain garment into something fancy.
  • Interior decorations – Tapestries, wall hangings, pillows, table runners.
  • Heirlooms – Baby blankets, Wedding Hanky’s.
  • Flags
  • DIY kits (include the material, the embroidery thread, needle, hoop, directions or instructions).
  • Bookmarks
  • Smocking plates (a lot of people don’t want to do these themselves, even though it is really simple in my opinion, it still takes time and resources that they may not have or want to expend).
  • Grid pictures and patterns.
  • ANYTHING can be personalized to add an extra incentive for customers to buy.
Smocked dress
Smocked dress (Photo credit: Gauis Caecilius)

These are really time-consuming crafts, so really play-up that they are hand made with careful attention to each stitch and detail. If you make-up your own patterns market the individuality of you as the designer and artist. Hand-stitched, will probably be your key words to use on a regular basis. Don’t be afraid to let your customers know how much time and energy is going into one garment.

If you purchase pre-made garments and then personalize them in whatever way, don’t be afraid to let your customers know where you get these, and even let them supply their own garments when able. ¬†Even if you just did the smocking on that little girl’s dress, you picked out the pattern, the colors to use, and even the dress to put it all on. ¬†So, try marketing to that perspective.

If you are making wedding or heirloom items, make sure that your products are TOP quality, and then TELL your customers that they are such. ¬†Always make sure that you are pricing your items competitively, and let your customers know why they are priced that way. ¬†Higher quality goods are going to cost a little bit more…market that!

There are lots of different ways that you can advertise and market these particular niches of needle art.  I think that the biggest marketing campaign is going to be letting your customers know when something is hand-stitched.  Even if you do use a machine, people are willing to pay for customized products and cuteness!!

Blog topics – once again, I am covering 3 different crafts in this post (albeit related crafts), so I am going to have 15 blog topics instead of the normal 10

  1. How did you learn to do this craft?
  2. What is your inspiration for your products?
  3. Where do you get your materials?
  4. Let your needle have a conversation with the fabric.  Or your pleater can have a conversation with the needles.  Or whatever materials you use, let them talk to each other about what is going on.
  5. embroidered roller skate
    embroidered roller skate (Photo credit: F. Tronchin)

    Explain, in a different perspective, the creation process.  Maybe take the point of view of your left pinky fingernail.  Take your craft from the research period, to the gathering materials, to the actual creation, marketing, and all the way to the packaging and shipping out.

  6. Why do you sell what you make?  to what purpose does your business exist?
  7. A day in the life of… pick something, pick one of your tools, talk about yourself, maybe from the table where all of your work takes place.
  8. Tutorial. ¬†Maybe from the very beginning. ¬†“How to smock: basic stitches”.
  9. Maybe throw in a “help me” post to give suggestions, tips, advice, to fellow needle artists.
  10. In what ways have you grown and developed your skill set to become more efficient, faster, or increase the quality of your work since the beginning of your business?
  11. Where do you get your patterns?  Or if you design your own, when did you first start doing that?
  12. Research the production of your materials.  For example, pick your favorite brand of embroidery thread.  Find out how it is manufactured.  Then, narrate the process, or go on a factory tour.
  13. Try something new.  If you normally cross stitch on the specially designed fabric, why not try to cross stitch on a pillow case?
  14. Is there something about your craft that bothers you? ¬†Don’t be afraid to rant about it.
  15. Famous people who needle art.  Google it, do a bit of research, then blog about these historic or pop culture figures.

I don’t think that hand-stitching is necessarily hard, but it does take a bit of time. ¬†Time that a lot of people don’t want to spend. ¬†If you have a blog about ANY needle craft, leave a comment with your page link, I sure would love to come check you out!

To check out my other “For the Crafter” posts in the series, just click a link below

INTRODUCTION

For the Bookworm (Part 1)

For the Bookworm (Part 2)

For the Cook

For the Seamstress

For the Painter

For the Photographer

For the Needle-arter (Part 1)

For the Needle-arter (Part 2)

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For the needle art-er (part 1)


Felt food Easter cookies
Felt food Easter cookies (Photo credit: ivers)

Needle art actually covers a wide variety of¬†crafts. ¬†Dictionary.com wasn’t able to define the term for me ūüė¶ but I did manage to find a lose¬†definition¬†on wikipedia: “Needlework¬†is a broad term for the¬†handicrafts¬†of decorative¬†sewing¬†and¬†textile arts. Anything that uses a¬†needle¬†for construction can be called needlework. ¬†The definition may expand to include related textile crafts such as a¬†crochet hook¬†or¬†tatting¬†shuttles.” ¬†This covers quite a range of crafts: crochet, knitting, cross stitch, weaving, smocking, embroidery, felting and others that I’m sure I am leaving out.

Since there are SO MANY needle works of art out there, I am going to be splitting this up into two different posts.  Today I am focusing on crochet, knitting, and felting.  While these are each quite different from each other, there are a bit of overlaps in these three.  Crochet involves one curved hook and is worked in a loopy fashion.  Knitting has two straight needles with casting on and casting off.  While either one of these can be used for felting (using a specific kind of yarn which is felted AFTER it is created in whichever method), there is also needle felting that is the art of shaping felt.

Stockinette stitch knitting (detail of Image:5...
Stockinette stitch knitting (detail of Image:556165_5691fcfdcb.jpg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Many who crochet also knit and vise versa, and several have also tried felting of some sort. ¬†I must admit that I have not ever taken the time to learn knitting and I have always wanted to try felting but just haven’t had the resources available. ¬†My husband often tells me in a joking manner, “just go knit, woman”, and I just have to respond, “but I don’t know how”.

So, off we go into the brainstorming section of this post.  Almost anything that involved textiles or fabrics can be crocheted, knitted, or felted.

  • Clothing – skirts, shirts, dresses, pants, shawls, head coverings, socks, slippers
  • Accessories – purses, jewelry, hats, scarfs
  • Special occasions – wedding, baptism, birthday
  • Applique¬†patches
  • Blankets
  • Interior decoration¬†– armchair covers, coasters, tapestries, curtains
  • Scrubbies – wash cloths, dish rags, face wipes
  • Stuffed toys¬†– balls, plushies, amigurumi, soft blocks
  • Materials – patterns, stitch markers, special¬†ergonomic¬†handled needles or hooks, hand-dyed yarns, hand spun yarns

I think that one of the best ways to market these crafts is to realize that this is not just a “granny” craft. ¬†A lot of people, men included, now crochet, knit, and felt. ¬†Appeal to the hand-made aspect of this craft, that each and every stitch is carefully planned and placed. ¬†A lot of time is going to go into the creation of just one product so let your customers know.

Each product is going to have tiny flaws that the customer may not ever notice, that’s just the nature of the craft. ¬†Use these flaws to your advantage, it’s ok to market them as OOAK (one of a kind), because they ARE hand-made. ¬†These little mistakes (that a professional might not even be able to notice) are going to give each item a unique character.

Again, advertise the use of recycled or organic yarn (like wool or cotton).  If you use synthetic, you can also advertise that it is hypoallergenic (a lot of people may be allergic to the organic stuff).  It might even be a good idea to have both kinds available for customer choices.  Is the fiber dye non toxic, machine washable, need any special care?

Yarn Palette
Yarn Palette (Photo credit: Dvortygirl)

Don’t forget to market to your target audience. ¬†If you sell children’s toys then your market is not the children it’s the adults who are going to be purchasing for the children. ¬†What sort of qualities does your product possess that is going to enhance development or be safer than store-bought toys? ¬†For special events products, try to focus on the quality of the product that you supply. ¬†People are willing to pay a lot more for quality over quantity, especially for momentous occasions like weddings, birthdays, etc.

I know that a lot of people prefer to make these specific crafts as made-to-order instead of ready-to-ship, but either one can be a marketing ploy.  For made-to-order, let your customers know that you make exactly what THEY want exactly HOW they want it.  For ready-to-ship why not offer free shipping?  Lots of people are willing to pay a little more for a product if they can get free shipping on it!

Blog topics – since I am covering 3 different crafts in this post, I am going to have 15 blog topics instead of the normal 10

  1. How did you chose your niche?
  2. Do you know how to do these other crafts – i.e. if you knit, do you also know how to crochet?
  3. When did you first learn your craft, who taught you or did you teach yourself?
  4. What sort of experience do you have in your craft?  How long have you been felting?
  5. Favorite textile to work with.  Be as specific or as vague as you like, include brand names or discuss chunky yarn vs thread.
  6. Organic versus synthetic
  7. If you felt, discuss your process.  Do you knit a garment first and then felt it?  What are the measurements of the garment before felting versus after felting?  Do you hand-felt or use a machine?
  8. crochet-web
    crochet-web (Photo credit: Bob Richmond)

    Include a pattern or tutorial for beginners.  Better yet, throw in a video!

  9. Photograph your work-space, or explain your method for organizing your materials and stash.
  10. How much time do you generally put into one product?  From researching the idea, to finding the pattern, to actually putting the product together.
  11. What’s your opinion on free patterns? ¬†Do you prefer to make up your own pattern or purchase someone else’s?
  12. Is there a method that you’ve always wanted to try but haven’t been able to yet? ¬†Tunusian crochet, or using a circular knitting needle.
  13. What sort of material do you stuff into the plushies?
  14. If you have ever bought a sweater or scarf specifically for the yarn it was made out of, go ahead and blog about how you took it apart and what you created from it.
  15. What about crocheting just a sheet of fabric and then cutting and sewing it into a garment?

These are all three some pretty versatile crafts. ¬†There are lots of options that you can take with any one of them. ¬†Personally, I like to crochet hats and photo props, but I’m also working on writing up some patterns to go on sale too! ¬†For extra versatility, why not learn one of the others and throw that into your creation lines as well? ¬†If you have a blog about ANY needle craft, leave a comment with your page link, I sure would love to come check you out!

To check out my other “For the Crafter” posts in the series, just click a link below

INTRODUCTION

For the Bookworm (Part 1)

For the Bookworm (Part 2)

For the Cook

For the Seamstress

For the Painter

For the Photographer

For the Needle-arter (Part 1)

For the Needle-arter (Part 2)

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Super Saturday Selections – How to decide?


Hyperbolic crochet kelp garden by the Institut...
Hyperbolic crochet kelp garden by the Institute For Figuring at the Los Angeles County Fair. Sept 2006. The installation is part of the Fair Exchange show at the worlds biggest celebration of prize-winning animals andhome-baked wonders. A book with Instructions for making these models is available at the IFF website: theiff.org/publications/index.html photo by the IFF (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I am in the process of working on a blog post about picking a specific niche for your business (subscribe so you’ll be sure not to miss it!). ¬†It’s important to have a few things that are very well represented instead of a lot of things that are only partially represented. ¬†Well, if you like to make a whole bunch of different things, how on earth do you decide which one to choose? ¬†It’s definitely a selection process (Hence why this is going on “Super Saturday SELECTIONS”). ¬†I’ll be using my own business as an example.

I LOVE to crochet, I also enjoy painting, and I like to sew, and occasionally, I like to paste. ¬†These things are all really easy for me. ¬†Let’s narrow this down even further…you can find a crochet pattern for virtually *anything*: ¬†From toys (amigurumi), to pillows, to dresses, to hats, to shoes and slippers, to decorations, to pot holders, to slip covers, to scarfs, to shorts, to bikinis, etc etc. ¬†If you can think it up, I’m sure there is a crochet pattern out there that has been designed. ¬†I’m really good at crocheting, and it would be really easy for me to work up some of everything to throw in my shop. ¬†How do I decide what to represent, and why do some things not make the cut?

  • The enjoyment of the creation process. ¬†Some things just aren’t fun for me to crochet. ¬†Either they take too much time, or they are too intricate, or I get bored doing the same row over and over and over again. ¬†If I don’t enjoy making the product the first time, I for sure am not going to enjoy doing it a second, a third, or a tenth, or twentieth time. ¬†These products get sliced off my list.
  • Liberty Dollar
    Liberty Dollar (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    Cost effectiveness. ¬†I could crochet an iphone case, it would be easy, it would be relatively quick (as far as crochet products go). ¬†But, to make it worth my time and effort, I would have to charge twice what a seamstress would charge for hers. ¬†So, why not sew them instead of crochet them? ¬†I don’t have a readily¬†available¬†fabric store¬†nearby. ¬†I’d have to order the fabric. ¬†Shipping costs would have to be increased due to the cost of materials, and I’d still have to charge more for the end product. ¬†If I can’t offer a competitive price for my products (and still be fair to myself), that product gets cut.

  • Does it sell? ¬†If you’re just starting out, it may be a good idea to dip your toe into several different niche’s. ¬†See what is going to sell, figure out what your customers are looking for. ¬†If it isn’t ging to sell, cross it off, don’t spend your time working on it. ¬†If you find a really good product that sells often, try expanding it a bit. ¬†Add more options – colors, sizes. ¬†If your initial idea isn’t selling, don’t waste your time on it. ¬†Maybe later you can come back to it; figure out why it wasn’t selling, change it up a bit, and try again.
  • Appeal to your target audience. ¬†I mostly sell crocheted newborn photo props, this means my target audience is soon-to-be-mothers and photographers (and soon-to-be-grandmothers). ¬†It would probably not be a good idea to all of a sudden start selling ipad sleeves. ¬†Sure, those new mothers might have an ipad that needs protection, but they are very far from the majority of ipad purchasers. ¬†My target audience would change. ¬†My attention would change. ¬†Instead of focusing on photo props and other things that a new baby would need, I’d be spending my time on electronic accessories. ¬†Basically, I’d be tearing down everything I’ve worked so hard to achieve with my current target audience and re-building up from scratch. ¬†If your new idea doesn’t appeal to your target audience, trash it.
Selling in the wat to
Selling in the wat to (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’ve seen a few people who have two or more shops in order to cover two or more niches. ¬†If you have the time and energy to devote equally to each shop, I say go for it! ¬†You can always refer customers of one shop over to the other shop.

I promise, that I will cover “why a specific niche is important” at a later time. ¬†For now, just take my word for it, it’s important ūüėõ

So, I’d love to hear from you: ¬†How do you decide what to make and sell, and what not to? ¬†Leave a comment, let the world know!!